Big Tech's War On Freedom

Big Tech’s War On Freedom

The 1998 movie Enemy of the State starring Gene Hackman and Will Smith seemed like fiction at the time. Why I didn’t regard that movie – which still holds up in nearly every detail – as a warning I do not know. It pulls back the curtain on the close working relationship between national security agencies and the communications industry – spying, censorship, blackmailing, and worse. Today, it seems not just a warning but a description of reality.
We tried to run a simple two question survey to find out just how safe or unsafe the vaccines are. Google refused to let us ask the questions.
Many of us with a libertarian frame of mind presume as a matter of theory that the interests of business are at odds with those of government. That’s generally true for businesses of a certain size. The regulations and taxes one faces in running an enterprise in the “land of free” are utterly shocking, as any small business owner can tell you. Even gaining the legal right to pay an employee is an arduous undertaking.
In a polarized political environment where working across party lines is rare, legislative measures to break up Big Tech monopolies have received support from both ends of the aisle. This reaction is owed to recently-released classified documents that could help lawmakers break up Big Tech companies.
Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry and Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt have served Fauci with a lawsuit accusing him of colluding with Big Tech to suppress free speech.
Microsoft wants to demonstrate its efforts to its US supporters in an effort to win a piece of the $15 billion funding set aside by the Pentagon. So, Microsoft is taking over Ukraine's digital networks at Pentagon's behest.
The social credit score has yet another unflattering facet - new dystopian law that would give all social media users a ‘truth score.’
In an interview with TOI, Rajeev Chandrasekhar, the minister of state for IT and electronics, said India is planning to make Google and Facebook pay news publishers for using their content.
In the mid-18th century, a secretive political group began spreading dangerous conspiracy theories throughout Britain’s colonies. British subjects had long enjoyed the freedom of expression, but these radicals abused novel communication platforms to churn out seditious literature not often grounded in fact (read below), even resorting to threats and violence that endangered those around them.
A new report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emphasizes the need to remove billions of tons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, which is why Big Tech is investing in carbon removal, stressing that reducing emissions alone will not suffice.