Culture & Society Great Game Jan-Mar 2016 Issue

Displacement, Depopulation & Destruction Of Third World Geo-Economics

Since the advent of the Roman Empire there were continuous attempts to grab resources from other regions. The most favourable method followed was to kill everybody whom they did not like. This policy was sanctified when the papal bull Inter Caetera was issued in 1493. In its wildest sense it was interpreted by its followers as having possession or sovereignty over anything they touch and kill everyone who opposed it. This was the beginning of spiritual depopulation of America’s and Africa by claiming that blacks, browns and reds did not possess any soul and so can be killed. Flowing the Spanish massacre of Indians in South America, British in the current USA came up with their own version of killings.

To control the resources, they distributed small-pox infested blankets to resisting Indians to wipe them out. Millions of souls perished in a span of 100 years in America’s and Africa thus making the resources available to what is currently known as USA, making it a superpower. Now the eyes are set on Indian and Chinese resources and the same policy is reflected in West’s National Policy documents which indicate India as a greatest threat for their survival. How this depopulation strategy plays out in the Indian context and how to survive it as a nation and culture is the subject matter of this series of articles which GreatGameIndia will bring forth in future issues.

Throughout civilizations for centuries together we have seen many wars; fighting for kingdoms or to push religious ideologies onto people, but they never meddled with ‘nature’ because most of them saw it as a sacred thing. In India since ages ‘nature’ was a part of cultural life, where we saw trees, plants and agricultural crops in their spiritual aspect rather than commercial. That is why even though we had capability to lay roads and build huge infrastructure projects we didn’t pursue such type of development because we saw it as cultural degradation and could foresee the harmful effects of such development later generations of societies would have to suffer.

Beginning of Chemical Warfare – Discovery of Benzene

With the discovery of Benzene the lethal chemical pesticide industry came to boom. Though these chemicals were first used in World War 2 chemical warfare divisions, after the war their alternative application was to convert them into agricultural pesticides. This pesticide solution though initially worked for 20 years after World War 2, started popping more pest resistant bugs and as a result more and more pesticides were needed to solve the problem.

After the war US got war profits and Germany produced brilliant scientists. Both the US and German interests merged to create powerful industrial conglomerates. Between 1914 till date another phenomenon occurred in USA. The British seeking revenge for their defeat in the US War of Independence steadily and slowly tried to undermine American independence by creating banking and industrial conglomerates in USA as opposed to free entrepreneurship, liberty and creative innovation guaranteed by US constitution. This battle is still waged by current senators like Ron Paul (libertarian) and others. This battle of control for the US government between British sponsored banker industrialist elite and US constitutional libertarians saw hundreds of people die including presidents. Since 1975 post the death of President Kennedy, US, slowly but steadily slipped into the control of British sponsored crony capitalist multinational corporations with disastrous effects for the world at large.

At the same time US is also struggling to win the war with Vietnam, a tiny country in South Asia. From 1967-1972 US conducted ‘Weather Warfare’ on Vietnam. This was the first time when reports officially came out about ‘Weather Warfare’. But sadly no Indian media covered it or either military or civil education system taught about this kind of warfare to Indian society.

In developed countries more than dozen academies study about Chemical and other kind of Warfare which the Indian society has never heard off even after more than 60 years of independence.

For instance, on Dec. 10, 1974, the U.S. National Security Council under Henry Kissinger completed a classified 200-page study called the “National Security Study Memorandum 200: Implications of Worldwide Population Growth for U.S. Security and Overseas Interests.” The study falsely claimed that population growth in the so-called Lesser Developed Countries (LDCs) was a grave threat to U.S. national security. Adopted as official policy in November 1975 by President Gerald Ford, NSSM 200 outlined a covert plan to reduce population growth in those countries through birth control, and also, implicitly, war and famine. Brent Scowcroft, who had by then replaced Kissinger as national security adviser (the same post Scowcroft was to hold in the Bush administration), was put in charge of implementing the plan. CIA Director George Bush was ordered to assist Scowcroft, as were the secretaries of state, treasury, defense, and agriculture.

One of the major sources for the study was the Royal Commission on Population, which King George VI had created in 1944 “to consider what measures should be taken in the national interest to influence the future trend of population.” The commission found that Britain was gravely threatened by population growth in its colonies, since “a populous country has decided advantages over a sparsely-populated one for industrial production.” The combined effects of increasing population and industrialization in its colonies, it warned, “might be decisive in its effects on the prestige and influence of the West,” especially effecting “military strength and security.”

The average Indian citizen is left with the impression that the religious wars of Europe are a relic of the past. This erroneous assumption is perhaps critical in preventing him from understanding the political reality of today. The fact is that while the wars of Europe provided motive for the exploitation of India in the past, they continue to do so even today. We hope this article will provide an insight into the sophistication and complexity of the manner in which these are carried out.

For instance we take the case when Britain used Indian troops like guinea pigs to test mustard gas. British military scientists tested mustard gas on hundreds of Indian soldiers in more than a decade of experiments. Indians were sent into the gas chambers wearing no more than “drill shorts and open-necked khaki cotton shirts” to gauge the effect of mustard gas on their eyes. The experiments to determine whether mustard gas damaged Indians’ skin more than British soldiers’ began in the early 1930s and lasted more than 10 years at a military site in Rawalpindi, now in Pakistan. The tests caused large numbers of burns, some of which were so damaging the subjects had to be hospitalized.

During World War II, nearly 2,000 American military personnel participated in experiments conducted by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. They were often promised weekend passes and were not told the nature of the experiments, which…

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GreatGameIndia Magazine Jan-Mar 2016 Issue